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Adult Education

Sunday Morning Classes

Sunday morning classes for adults are a great way to make friends, learn about our faith and our world, and find new ways to apply spiritual principles to your life. Classes, which meet 10:15 - 11 a.m. September-May, are broken up into short terms during the program year, so that there are always a variety of topics to choose from. Anyone is welcome to join a class at any time. 

Green Term 1: September 15–September 29

Parenting as a Spiritual Practice: The joys and challenges of caring for children can be a transformative aspect of our spiritual lives. How does our faith shape the daily decisions we make as parents? Sunday, October 13: How to Maintain the Marital Relationship while Parenting Children. Led by Bill and Ashley McCarthy who are both psychotherapeutic practitioners in Greensboro and the parents of 15 year old twins. Enjoy a refreshing and authentic overview of maintaining marriage in the context of parenting. Bill and Ashley will present and facilitate dialogue on ideas including expectations, stressors, romance, co-parenting discipline, and conflict management. Led by Bill & Ashley McCarthy, Broome Hall. September 15, 22, 29, and October 13, Broome Hall

History Behind the Headlines: We live in an unsettled, complex and rapidly changing world. There continues to be surprising, and sometimes alarming, developments, shifts and challenges to the world we thought we knew. In this class, we will dig down into the historical roots of several of the current “hot spots.” Led by Dr. Jeff Jones, Professor of History at UNCG. September 15–29, Haywood Duke

Holy Trinity 101: Holy Trinity 101 is a great place to connect for authentic faith conversation and to learn how people at Holy Trinity practice “an inward journey of faith and an outward journey of service.” We explore topics such as how to use the Book of Common Prayer, understanding Episcopal liturgical worship, living daily as “true self,” connecting to meaningful ministry using our GIFTS (Growing in Faith Through Service), faith pilgrimage, sacraments, membership at Holy Trinity, reading the Bible, and much more. Led by the Rev. Mark Lile-King.  Sunday: September 22: How to Use the Book of Common Prayer— The Rev. Canon Pat Grace will lead the conversation on Sunday, September 22, at 10:15 a.m. in Roe Library. Hosted by Gateway Ministry. 

Making Sense of the Bible — Holy Trinity 101 meets once monthly and is great place for newcomers and members alike to connect for authentic faith conversation and to learn how people at Holy Trinity practice “an inward journey of faith and an outward journey of service.” Rev. Mark Lile-King will lead the conversation on Sunday, October 20, at 10:15 a.m. in Roe Library. Bring your Bibles! Hosted by Gateway Ministry. Join us! 

Green Term 2: October 13–November 24

Parenting as a Spiritual Practice: See description above. October 13, Broome Hall

History in the Headlines: See description above.  October 13–November 24, Haywood Duke

Storytelling as Evangelism: John Shea says “We turn our pain into narrative so we can bear it; we turn our ecstasy into narrative so we can prolong it; we tell our stories to live.” The premise of this session is that we make meaning through stories. As Christians, therefore, we seek to locate our biographical story within the context of Christ’s never-ending story of death and resurrection. Our personal narrative only makes complete sense when it is connected to the sacred narrative. The way we share the Good News is not by selling a church product; it’s by telling the story of what God has done in our own lives and then inviting others to share their stories. This has been so since the Acts of the Apostles. Porter Taylor will teach about how to connect one’s stories to the never ending story of salvation. Led by Bishop Porter Taylor, retired bishop of the Diocese of Western North Carolina. October 20 and 27, Broome Hall

Holy Trinity 101: See description above. Monthly, 10:15–11 a.m., Café

The Process of Transition: In the Episcopal Church, the pathway to calling a new rector is governed by the Canons, overseen by the Bishop and his staff, and executed by the Vestry, Search Committee, Interim Rector and the congregation, itself. The way forward has many steps, but generally involves a time of reflection, preparation of a parish profile, receiving and reviewing candidates, then choosing the person who is the “best fit” for the church. The process is tried and true, and when done with spiritual discernment at its core, results in a very good call. During the month of November, we will explore the process of transition with the Search Committee and the Interim Rector, including the opportunity for members to reflect on the history and deeper identity of Holy Trinity. Led by the Rev. Canon Patricia Grace. November 3–24, Broome Hall

Advent Term: December 8–December 15

The Season of the Nativity for Families: The full season of the Nativity includes Advent, Christmas, and Epiphany. As the opening three acts of the liturgical year, this is the time that sets the stage for our spiritual journeys throughout the year. We will explore Advent as the season of Hope, Christmas as the season of Love, and Epiphany as the season of faith. In this class, you’ll receive simple tools and practices for weary, distracted, busy people inviting you to a joyous Nativity season. Led by the Rev. Greg Farrand and Marjorie Donnelly. December 8–15, Broome Hall

Cultivating Hope and Patience in Advent: These two lessons based on the lectionary passages for the day will look at how anticipation of the coming of Christ demands two qualities that many people interpret as passive, but in fact demand from us more than we might imagine. Led by Dr. Sandie Gravett, Professor of Philosophy and Religion, Appalachian State University. December 8–15, Haywood Duke Room 

Holy Trinity 101: See description above. Monthly, 10:15–11 a.m., Café